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Author Topic: Tried and Tested  (Read 18150 times)

Offline Rik

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Tried and Tested
« on: November 14, 2009, 17:58 »
OK, there are those who eat to live and those who live to eat. Being married to a fantastic cook, I've always fallen into the latter camp, so here's a few tried and tested suppliers we've found:

Donald Russell (meat and fish):

www.donaldrussell.com

Kit's Kitchen (pickles, chutneys and sauces):

www.kitskitchen.co.uk/chutneys.html

Wessex Mill (wide range of bread flours):

http://www.wessexmill.co.uk/index.html

Online deli:

www.melburyandappleton.co.uk/
www.kitchengardenoban.co.uk
www.finefoodstore.co.uk/

Forman & Field (London Cure smoked salmon & deli) *

www.formanandfield.com/

Pasties:

www.pasties-by-post.co.uk/index.php
www.warrensbakery.co.uk/products/pasties.htm
www.connexions.co.uk/lizardpasty/

Sausages, bacon & ham:

www.richardwoodall.com/
www.supremesausages.co.uk

Peat-smoked salmon, trout etc:

www.hebrideansmokehouse.com/

Fish:

www.johnrossjr.com/

Real ales:

www.hogsback.co.uk/acatalog/shop.html
www.broughtonales.co.uk/
www.therealaleshop.co.uk/

Chocolate:

www.thorntons.co.uk/ThorntonsSite/pages/home/default.asp

Shere Khan curry sauces

www.sherekhansauces.co.uk


* Small reservation about customer service


---

Because I'm on a restricted salt diet, I've been busy doing research, and here's some salt levels, many of which are quite frightening:

This list is much updated and now further down the thread (P3).
« Last Edit: November 17, 2009, 17:12 by Rik »
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Offline GillE

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Re: Tried and Tested
« Reply #1 on: November 14, 2009, 18:09 »
Great list, Rik!

I can recommend Wessex Mill flours too.  A baker from Gloucester attends our local farmers market every month and sells them.  Amazingly, they're cheaper than supermarket flours and they bake better too.
There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.

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Offline Rik

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Re: Tried and Tested
« Reply #2 on: November 14, 2009, 18:20 »
We love their tomato and garlic. Gorgeous with cheese, instant pizza as a Welsh rarebit (worth trying the apple and cinnamon with cheese too).
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Offline GillE

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Re: Tried and Tested
« Reply #3 on: November 14, 2009, 18:25 »
I'm surprised you can eat cheese, Rik, given its salt content.
There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.

(Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

Offline Rik

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Re: Tried and Tested
« Reply #4 on: November 14, 2009, 18:30 »
We found a low salt one Leskol. It tastes good, but is much reduced in salt and fat. We grate it rather than slice (Microplane medium) and that makes a little go a long way. Highly recommended, as are the graters.
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Offline Simon

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Re: Tried and Tested
« Reply #5 on: November 14, 2009, 18:32 »
I think this deserves to be stickied, so I've stuck it.  :)
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Offline Rik

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Re: Tried and Tested
« Reply #6 on: November 14, 2009, 18:36 »
I won't ask where. ;D
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Offline Simon

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Re: Tried and Tested
« Reply #7 on: November 14, 2009, 18:47 »
 :leer:
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Offline Clive

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Re: Tried and Tested
« Reply #8 on: November 14, 2009, 20:33 »
I add just a pinch of salt to my bread Rik and wonder if I could get away without using any at all.  I will experiment next week and report back.
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Offline GillE

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Re: Tried and Tested
« Reply #9 on: November 14, 2009, 20:38 »
I seem to recall reading in a Richard Bertinet book that you need the salt to get a proper fermentation, Clive.  I'll see if I can find exactly what he wrote.
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Offline Clive

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Re: Tried and Tested
« Reply #10 on: November 14, 2009, 21:07 »
That's interesting Gill.  I once forgot to add sugar but the bread still turned out quite well.  But my recipe includes a teaspoon of Marvel so that may have helped the fermentation.   :dunno:
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Offline Simon

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Re: Tried and Tested
« Reply #11 on: November 15, 2009, 00:22 »
Is there more, or less, salt in white bread than in brown or wholemeal?
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Offline GillE

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Re: Tried and Tested
« Reply #12 on: November 15, 2009, 11:04 »
This is from Richard Bertinet's Crust:

there is so much worry these days over eating too much salt that it is easy to forget that we can't survive without it in our diet.  Salt is critical for regulating the hydration of the body.  It controls how much water passes in and out of our bodies' cells, cleansing them and extracting toxins and waste.  Provided we are physically active and eat a balanced diet with plenty of fresh fruit and vegetables, salt levels shouldn't be a worry; it is when we take no exercise and eat a diet laden with salt 'hidden' in processed foods that every gram becomes crucial.

Remember, though, that what we are talking about here is unrefined, natural sea or rock salt, which is very different from table salt (sodium chloride).  This is produced by heating the salt, a process which strips the raw product of all but a handful of the 80 or so minerals and other chemicals found in its natural state.   So when you bake, always use natural sea or rock salt...

It is hard to achieve good bread with a depth of flavour and a serious crust without salt.  And remember that although it might seem that you are adding a lot of salt to your mixing bowl, in proportion to the other ingredients it is relatively small.  I had a laboratory analysis done of 100g of my sourdough - that's two substantial slices - which shows that it contains 1.2g of salt.  By comparison 100g of cornflakes can contain 2g of salt.  And I know which I would prefer for breakfast.  Also, you have to look at the whole picture.  A typical processed white loaf can contain around 3.8g of sugar per 100g and 2.5g of fat per 100g, whereas my sourdough clocks up 2g sugar per 100g and 1.1g of fat (which are naturally occurring) and not an additive in sight.


I haven't yet found the article I read which explains how salt promotes yeast growth, but I'll keep looking :) .
There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.

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Offline Rik

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Re: Tried and Tested
« Reply #13 on: November 15, 2009, 11:11 »
Useful piece, Gill, thanks. :)

Afaik, salt acts as an inhibitor on the yeast (while the sugar acts to feed it), and this produces a better gluten, making the loaf rise evenly, with small bubbles and no collapse. We've found we can reduce the salt to about 75% before it has a bad effect, but we use malt extract and lemon juice to enhance the flavour. The malt also produces a slower rise - thus taking over from salt. We're looking to add some extra gluten next, which is how we found the flour bin. It seems to be more freely available in America than here.
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Offline Simon

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Re: Tried and Tested
« Reply #14 on: November 15, 2009, 11:13 »
That's very interesting, Gill.  I always use natural sea salt in cooking, and on chips, but I don't usually have it on other food.
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